Half-Pi Shawl

IMG_2333So hot on the heels of my successful Pi Shawlette I have decided to use the general formula of the half-pi shawl as a basis for a design.  I began with a garter tab cast on, I also have 3 stitches on either end that are simply knit with patterning and increases between these knit sections.  After the garter tab was picked up I worked a double yarn over increase row.  I then had 17 stitches total, these were worked as a simple knit for three rows.  Another increase row was worked, then I began a Daisy Stitch section.  This was worked for 7 rows before my next increase row, again with double yarn overs.

This is where I began some slightly more intricate patterning, though the daisy stitch was interesting, and I worked the seed stitch for three rounds with a row of knit two together, yarn overs, following, then another three rounds of seed stitch, followed by knit two together, yarnovers, finally 2 more rows of seed stitch and another increase round with double yarn overs.

Right now I am on rows 31-60, there are 95 stitches available for patterning.  I believe that I will be working the Butterfly Stitch across this so as to create a wonderfully textured shawl.  Then an increase round, then I will have 191 stitches available for patterning, and I will be working 63 rows.  If I choose to add another section, I probably will so as to create a very large shawl, then I will have 383 stitches available for patterning over 127 rows.  By my calculations this should result in a shawl that is well over 60″.

Savvy Girls Podcast Review

*WARNING, this is a No Fiber Content Post, if you want Fiber Content, sorry.  I’ll try to post Fiber Content Later this Week or Next Week*

Okay, to start with I will state that I do not agree with most Liberal Leaning statements.  There are some things politically that I despair about, and some that I am cheering.  What those are, is nobody’s business because I do not like to discuss politics and hate hearing about them.  Mom really liked politics, but listening to her complaining about them all the time just killed my interest.

That being said, I started listening to this podcast from the oldest podcast I could access up to the newest.  In the beginning the chatting about trips, and little informative bits about the gerbil, sparrow, and Savvy Girl Melanie’s Mom were interesting.  Then there were bits about the wedding, Melanie’s sister knitted her own canopy for her Jewish Wedding, I was fascinated by that.  Then comes the political rantings, about how Trump stinks…blah, blah, blah.  She’s living most of the time in Canada when she isn’t traveling for her job.  I made it to Episode 172 and Tidbit 37, so 12 Tidbits and 18 Full episodes into the podcast.  Admittedly this takes me up tot February of 2017, so if you want to see if the political content dies down in more recent podcasts go for it.  As for me, I can actually listen to podcasts about people, knitting, and crochet, spinning, weaving, attending conferences, etc.  Not about travel troubles, political nonsense, birds, gerbils, etc.

If you like random information, travel, liberal politics, and general chatter podcasts then this is the podcast for you.  If you want to hear about knitting, have a more conservative bent (or just hate politics) and don’t want to hear about the Sparrow then you might want to try another podcast.

If someone chooses to bring this post to the attention of the creators of the Savvy Girl’s podcast I am fine with that. I chose to not post a review because A. I don’t want to get roasted on their podcast & B. I know that there are plenty of people that find this podcast charming and I do not want to bring down the rating for reviewing this on iTunes.

Remember to Live Life A Little More Abstract.

Sock Obsession

Okay, so I still have not knit any socks, however I have started crocheting another 2 pairs.  I use the term pair loosely, the top sock is certainly going to wind up as a pair.  I love how it is turning out and I have plenty of yarn for the second sock.  The pattern is from the Interweave Crochet Issue Winter 2011 on page 56.  The top sock is out of a fingering weight yarn using a size E crochet hook following the pattern almost exactly.  I added a few decreases where the sock hits my ankle to avoid the pouch of fabric the other sock is showing.  The bottom sock, which will not have a matching mate but I believe will wind up having a crazy mate out of a different yarn altogether, is made using the same hook as well as the same pattern.  The top sock has a looser fabric, I will probably try and play with that if I have any yarn left after the pair is finished, but the bottom sock has a much tighter fabric.

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According to sock experts this means that the bottom sock will wear better and the top will wear out sooner.  I have to confess, if I can figure out a good pattern that will work with fingering weight yarn, yet be fun to crochet, I don’t think I will ever bother learning to knit socks.  Only time will tell however.  There is a new form of knitting needles called Addi FlexiFlips and they might be what I need to help socks become easy enough for me to consider knitting, but at over $20 a set I almost think I would have to be in love with sock knitting before I invest.  Fortunately I might be able to visit a yarn store and take these for a test knit sometime and see if it is worth the investment.  Until then, I’m going to keep crocheting socks!

Happy Crafting!

Sheepspot Podcast by Sasha Torres

Sheepspot by Sasha Torres is a great podcast and an overall great spinning resource.  If you are looking for a podcast that will help you become a better spinner then this is the first one I would recommend.  She is very strict about sharing information and making it clear that each podcast is going to have a lesson to teach, but that there will be print resources available.  Even if you do not listen to the podcasts, subscribe to her newsletter.  You will certainly get more out of it if you do both, but even with just her newsletter you will gain access to all of the great resources she publishes.  At a wild guess I would say that Sasha is a librarian or otherwise involved in higher education, she gives detailed resource information for all of her podcasts and makes sure that the information is concise, clear, and readily available.  As of the writing of this review she is just working on six ways to get out of a spinning rut, her online course.  It does run a bit expensive, but I imagine it will be handy.  Since I have not taken it, nor will I have the means to do so in the immediate future, I cannot say it will be worth it or not.

Check out this great podcast/resource.  It is well worth the time.

Happy Listening.

Beekeeper’s Quilt

I am working on the Beekeeper’s Quilt, the pattern is by Tiny Owl Knits and can be found on Ravelry.  Each little Hexipuff is knit as an individual project, stuffed, and put in a basket until you have a sufficient amount to piece together for a completed quilt.  I can knit about one hexipuff a day, due to time constraints and my very slow knitting.  It will take about 580 Hexipuffs to make a quilt 5.5 Feet X 6 Feet.  Since I like my quilts to be able to actually cover me this is the size I am aiming for.  A 3 foot by 4 foot quilt would be 384 hexipuffs but I would consider that a very small quilt.

If I were able to knit a hexie every single day it would take me about 2 years to create the hexie’s and probably another year to piece it together.  This would certainly qualify as a big project.  Well, I cannot make a three year project easy on myself now can I?  No!  I decided that I was going to create two different hexipuff quilts.  One will be made up of hexie’s that I knit from my own handspun yarn.

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The second quilt that I plan on working on will consist of scraps of yarn, usually some fancy yarns that I will not purchase an entire skein of.  For example JimmyBeansWool.com allows 20 yard samples of some of their yarns to be purchased.  While I find myself reluctant to purchase a skein of Madeline Tosh (MadTosh) yarn for $25-$35 a skein, I can justify spending about $1.25 for enough yarn to create a hexipuff and a half.  It really is still quite expensive, but it allows me to fool myself into thinking that I am being thrifty.  I have also discovered that the MadTosh yarn is really exquisite to work with and creates a very pretty, silky puff.  If I were really into clothing knitting I would certainly consider some of this.  The yarn to the left is a thin sock yarn, that I might need to use a smaller needle if I want to knit the rest of my sample skein into hexie’s, and the right is the MadTosh yarn in Swimming Pool colorway.

 

I really enjoy knitting up these tiny hexies on my size 8 Dpns out of wood.  I love how the needles work with the yarn, and I really enjoy working with my handspun so I get an idea of what works and what does not with my yarn.

Happy Crafting!

Very Pink Knits Podcast

Very Pink Knits:

The tagline of this podcast is: “Where we turn knitting questions into knitting answers” and that really covers this podcast well. There are bits of their personal lives involved, just enough to make them seem human, but there are also a lot of questions answered. Very good, and I have heard great things about the teaching videos also available from verypinkknits.com.  The hosts are likeable and friendly but they also tend to dive right into the questions.  There are ususally 2-5 questions answered in a podcast but the hosts are very aware of the time, so the shows are usually about 20 minutes long, which I find to be a decent amount of time.

Started in September

The first of my Fall Crafting Classes is complete.  I cannot believe that the summer is gone and fall is beginning, c’est la vie.

A couple of my students finished their tapestries form the end of the Wooly Wednesdays, and several students made considerable progress working on their plastic canvas patterns.  I am so excited to see how far my patrons get next week, we are supposed to start on the counted cross stitch then, it will be fascinating to see their progress.

Happy Crafting!